The Importance of Speech Therapy Certification

Speech therapy is an important service offered within the category of healthcare services. A more specialized medical career, speech-language pathologists work with patients of all ages, and with a variety of challenges, in order to help them communicate more clearly with the world around them.

It is a highly regulated profession, in most cases requiring practitioners to obtain a certification, but also one that is both diverse and interesting. Geared toward those interested in teaching, as well as therapeutic services, a career as a speech therapist can be highly rewarding for the right individuals.

Becoming a Speech Therapist

Prospective students who are interested in a career as a speech-language pathologist will need to fulfill specific educational requirements in order to do so.

In the US, Canada and other countries, practitioners who seek certification are required to complete a minimum of a Master’s degree in speech-language pathology, though there are a few shorter programs available.

In the UK and a few other areas, national registration with regulatory healthcare organizations is sometimes obtainable with a Bachelor’s degree, or other accelerated educational programs as well.

Regardless, in all cases, a Master’s degree is still highly recommended since it is more preferable to employers, and offers the most in employment options and career advancement.

Gaining Certification in Speech Therapy

In order to become certified, students will need to provide proof of having graduated from an appropriate accredited educational program, which makes them eligible to take the national certification examination.

Licensing is required in most states and provinces in the US and Canada, and in some cases, certification is required in order for practitioners to become licensed to practice within their state.

Additionally, as mentioned above, since it is such a specialized profession, most employers today require that candidates be certified before they will be considered for hire.

Certification examinations in the US are provided by and maintained by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASLA), which awards the title of Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology, or CCC-SLP.

Canadian graduates can take the certification exam offered by the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists (CASLPA), which will provide practitioners with a Certificate of Clinical Certification.

In both cases, practitioners are required to be a member in good standing of the issuing professional organization, and they are required to keep up their certification through the accruement of a specific amount of Continuing Education hours each year; failure to do so can result in loss of certification, and the need to re-test to regain this qualification.

Certification is handled somewhat differently in some areas however, such as in the UK, where registration with the HCPC acts as the main proof of ability.

Only graduates of programs that are both accredited by the Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists (RCSLT) and recognized by the HCPC enable graduates to register with the HCPC.

There are a select few specialty certifications that can be earned through separate programs associated with the RCSLT, but these are not required for HCPC registration, and are typically taken after a practitioner has been working for some time, has gained considerable work experience, and would like to specialize in one area of therapy over general therapy.

The Importance of Accreditation

In all cases, one of the most important considerations that any prospective student needs to make before they enroll in a speech-language pathology degree program is whether or not it is accredited.

Students are only eligible to obtain certification if they have graduated a recognized, accredited program, which serves as a measure that each student has been provided the most accurate, up to date and complete education and training as possible.

To find out which college programs are accredited, prospective students are recommended to contact their country’s professional organization in Speech-Language Pathology, as these groups are typically involved with accreditation of educational programs, and maintain a list of them.

In the US, the ASHA is partnered with the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, and together helps grade and approve all acceptable programs, and uphold educational standards of their approved programs.

Canadian accreditation is handled by the CASLPA in partnership with the Council for Accreditation of University Programs in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CACUP-ASLP). UK accreditation, as mentioned above, is handled by the RCSLT in conjunction with HCPC requirements.

Although it may seem like getting a certification might be challenging, students who are dedicated to their new profession, and are interested in getting the best education they possibly can will benefit greatly from their effort.

Not only will they have access to the best jobs in their profession, but they will reap the many other benefits that certification offers, such as career advancement and increased salary as well.

How to Get Your HVAC Certification and HVAC Licensing

An HVAC technician can enjoy a variety of benefits including job stability and a hands-on career field. As you complete your HVAC training, make sure to get the right certification and licensing to start you out on a good path to success.

Just follow these 4 simple steps:

  1. Complete an HVAC training program.
  2. Take your HVAC certification or licensing or exams.
  3. Apply for an HVAC apprenticeship.
  4. Apply for entry level HVAC technician jobs.

1. Complete an HVAC training program.

Enroll in an HVAC training program at a local HVAC training school. You can usually complete these programs in less than 2 years. Some colleges may even award you with an associate degree in the process.

2. Take your HVAC certification or licensing exams.

Licensing in Colorado

Some states will require heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers to be licensed, others will not. Colorado happens to be one of the states that allow licensing for HVAC technicians to be handled at the county level. Each county may or may not require licensing through their respective building departments. However, it is a good idea to look into it if it’s available, for the purpose of doing work that requires permits.

For details on how to get your Heating Mechanic IV license in El Paso County, for example, visit the Contractor Licensing & Registration page at the Pikes Peak Regional Building Department (Pikes Peak RBD) website.

HVAC Certification

If you choose to work in refrigeration you will need to be certified in EPA 608, as required by federal law. For this you must pass a written exam specific to the types of equipment and refrigerants you will be handling. Most quality HVAC training programs include federal EPA 608 training and certification preparation.

Being certified in the HVAC field can allow for higher paying jobs. In the HVAC Excellence program there are several certification exams to choose from for students just starting out. Professional level certifications are also available and require employment verifications and core testing to advance your career. Check them out!

15 Employment Ready HVAC Certifications

  1. Electrical – Suggested prerequisite for all other certifications in the HVAC Excellence program
  2. Light Commercial Air Conditioning
  3. Air Conditioning
  4. Basic Refrigeration and Charging Procedures
  5. Electric Heat
  6. Gas Heat Certification
  7. Oil Heat
  8. Residential and Light Commercial Hydronic Heat
  9. Heat Pump
  10. Carbon Monoxide
  11. System Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Procedures
  12. Fuel Oil Combustion
  13. Natural Gas Combustion Analysis
  14. Carbon Monoxide and Combustion Analysis
  15. Light Commercial Refrigeration

Take advantage of what’s out there, like specialized HVAC training schools, hands-on training, and a multitude of certifications. Now that you know what you have to do and where to get it done, you can be on your way to a new career as an HVAC Technician.

3. Apply for an HVAC apprenticeship.

After completing your HVAC training, you may choose an apprenticeship as your next step. Simply apply to or enroll in an apprenticeship program with an experienced HVAC organization in your area. Learn everything they have to offer and put it to practice. Your apprenticeship may last anywhere from 6 to 36 months.

4. Apply for entry level HVAC Technician jobs.

You can also enter the HVAC field directly after completing a training program and receiving your degree and/or certifications. Many HVAC contractors and employers often hire entry level HVAC technicians to “train in” to their organizations.

Many HVAC programs offer career placement assistance for graduates. Contact your local HVAC training school today and you can be on your way to a rewarding career in HVAC with a good transcript and a healthy resume.

Sources

  • Pikes Peak Regional Building Department, Contractors Licensing and Registration, pprbd.org/contfiles/ContLicensing.aspx
  • HVAC Excellence, Technician Certification, hvacexcellence.org/EmploymentReady.aspx
  • United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook 2010-11 Edition, bls.gov/oco/ocos192.htm

The Process of Medical Coding Certification

One does not need to have medical coding certification to work as a medical coder. Unlike other healthcare professions, which require intensive training and several years’ worth of book knowledge and practical experience, the tasks relegated to medical coders are relatively more mechanical and therefore easier to learn whether or not one has had any kind of medical training before.

Medical classification is the process of transforming descriptions of medical diagnoses and procedures taken from a variety of sources within the medical record into universal medical code numbers. These diagnosis codes are used to track different diseases and are a valuable source of information that may influence such sectors as government health agencies, private health insurance companies and worker’s compensation carriers.

Having medical coding certification gives the individual a competitive edge. Just having it listed down on one’s resume provides proof that the person has studied well and is qualified to work in her chosen career. Certified coders are more likely to be immediately hired and given higher compensation. They are also more likely to be recognized for higher positions after just a short term of experience within the healthcare institution.

To become a certified medical coder, one will have to pass a special certification exam. Depending on the program they have enrolled themselves in, individuals who are just starting to learn about medical classification can take the exam once they have passed their medical coding course. What awaits after is a flexible, stable and financially rewarding career in the flourishing healthcare industry.

The Difference Between HVAC Certification and HVAC License

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) technicians are skilled tradespersons that install heating and cooling systems. Additionally, they maintain and repair the system when problems arise. This may be in a residential setting or for commercial facilities. Those who work for a retailer are often responsible for selling service contracts to clients.

Types of Certification

Becoming HVAC certified will depend on the type of certification that you desire and the training that you have achieved. Since many people work in the field under a licensed HVAC person, they may have some experience before taking classes. Those who have over a year of experience in installation and at least 2 years in maintenance will have a wider choice when it comes to the type of HVAC certification they choose.

In order to become certified, the proper classes must be taken. Before doing so, a high school diploma or GED is required. This is required for admittance to most accredited HVAC training programs. These programs offer classes in the installation and repair of HVAC as well as reading blueprints, temperature control, construction and equipment design. The programs are available at various schools and colleges as well as online.

The programs are generally from six months to two years and depending on the length of the course, upon successful completion, the student will receive a certificate or an associate’s degree. There are also opportunities available for those who join the Armed Forces to receive specialized training in the HVAC field.

Licensing

After completing the training program successfully, earning a certification or a degree, sitting for the HVAC licensing exam will be required by most states to work in this field. The licensing exam will differ somewhat from one location to another. The main consideration is the knowledge of all the aspects of installation and repair of HVAC systems. In addition, some licensing exams require the applicant to know electrical codes.

If the career chosen will include working with refrigerants, a separate certification is needed for this field. This includes high and low-pressure refrigerants and servicing small appliances. When this career is chosen at an early age, usually while in high school, it is beneficial to take classes that can help in preparing the student for the classes they will take next. The basic recommendations are mathematics, physics, electronics and mechanical drawing.

There are additional licenses needed if the HVAC career will include contractor services. This is often a career that is chosen after learning the other aspects of HVAC. The qualifications to apply for a license as an HVAC contractor include being at least 18 years of age, speaking and reading the English language and four years of verifiable experience in warm heating.

If the applicant meets these qualifications, they must take an ICC examination. The International Code Council (ICC) develops these exams and they are in charge of giving them for many states. They are given at approved testing sites across the nation and are required for anyone that represents themselves in any way as an HVAC contractor.

As seen, the HVAC career is quite diverse. It can include various aspects of this profession, each having their own requirements and licenses.