Cosmetologist Careers: Employment Outlook

Cosmetology is an exciting field in growing demand. This is good news for anyone wishing to enter into a career in cosmetology.

You may be asking yourself some of these questions:

What sort of careers are out there for cosmetologists?

Who is hiring?

Will I be able to find a job?

Is their room for advancement?

What kind of money can I expect to make?

This article will answer these questions and more.

“… overall employment of barbers, cosmetologists and other personal appearance workers is projected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations,” states the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Employment Outlook for Cosmetologist Careers

Employment will likely vary depending on which cosmetologist career you enter into, but in general, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects:

  • “… employment as a hair stylist or cosmetologist is expected to grow at least 20% by 2018.”
  • “… this growth will primarily come from an increasing population, which will lead to greater demand for basic hair services.”

Advancement Opportunities for Cosmetologists

Earnings can be expected to increase along with in-demand cosmetology skills and hands-on salon experience. There truly is something for everyone. There are options for growth for many cosmetologist career fields, including:

  • Salon management
  • Salon ownership
  • Service or product sales
  • Image consulting
  • Teaching in a cosmetology school

Earnings for a Career in Cosmetology in Colorado

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, salaries can be expected to vary depending on area of expertise, level of employment, location and size of the salon, tips, bonuses, service commissions and number of hours worked. Many cosmetologists can also earn commissions on salon the products they are able to sell to their clients.

Earning stats from the U.S. Bureau of Labor

Mean Annual Salary Potential Earnings

• $12.74/hr • Up to $19.97/hr

• $26,510/yr • As much as $41,540/yr

Top Factors Determining Cosmetologist Career Salaries

  • Size and location of the salon
  • Hours worked
  • Level of skill and experience
  • Area of expertise (Hair/Nails/Makeup/Skin)
  • Tipping habits of clients
  • Competition from other salons
  • The cosmetologist’s ability to bring in and maintain regular clients

Summary

Now that you have the facts, you can go into your new career in cosmetology with confidence. You now know what to expect and what you can do to get the most out of your new career as a professional cosmetologist. Find a Cosmetology school today and make it official!

CNA Guide – Nurse Aide Training Program, Exam, Job, Salary, and Job Outlook

Certified Nursing Aides are valuable members and lifeline of the health care industry. They perform a broad range of nursing tasks and spend highest time with residents compared to other members of a medical team. The classroom instructions and clinical hands-on experience of CNA Training program provide them expertise in nursing care. According to the PHI survey, direct care workers are responsible for offering activities of daily living (ADL) and basic care to 70 to 80% Americans living with chronic conditions, disabilities, and long illness.

CNA Classes

Nurse aides must complete state-approved training programs and earn certification by passing the state-approved examination to be able to work as a CNA. The federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA ’87) have also made it mandatory for the states to provide minimum 59 hours classroom instructions and 16 hours clinical training to nursing assistants. The states should also assess their nursing care competencies through competency evaluation exams prior to their performing as a CNA. These OBRA measures are adopted by Congress for improving the quality and standards of cares for residents in the facilities.

CNA Exam

Nurse aide Exams are a means through which states implement OBRA-87 measures for evaluating nursing care competencies, skills, knowledge, and abilities of nurse assistants. The state’s home health departments are mainly responsible for developing and administrating these exams. However, many states have also contracted national exam providers like Pearson VUE, Prometric, and D & S Headmaster for developing, administering, and scoring nursing assistant exams. The examination consists of Oral or Written Tests, and Skills demonstration test. The test papers are prepared on the basis of classroom teachings and clinical trainings. The candidates must score required passing grade to be eligible for certification.

Jobs

Nursing assistants and orderlies work in health care settings where their nursing proficiencies are essential for performing basic nursing cares and activities of daily living (ADLs). They are mostly found working in skilled nursing facilities, assisted living centers, long-term care units, residential care facilities, and home health agencies. In these facilities, nursing assistants offer ADLs and personal assistance to elderly and other people who suffer from disabilities and chronic conditions, long illness, and severe injuries.

Salary

According to the Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2013, total employments for Nursing assistants were 1,427,830, and their Mean hourly wage was $12.51, and Mean annual wage $26,020. However, their percentile median annual wage from starting 10 percent to 90 percent varied from $18,600 to $35,780 annually. The variation in wages was due to factors such as practical work experience, places of work, job types, education and training, and position. The salaries also differ in states, cities, and metropolitans due to density of population, nursing shortages, numbers of health care facilities, and hospitals.

Job Outlook

In coming years, the demand for nursing assistants will continue to rise rapidly, and more nurse aides will be required to perform varied basic nursing care duties. The factors responsible for higher nurse aide demands include nursing shortage, baby boomers age, and increase in aging population. During this period, many nurse aides will also retire and leave nursing for other high paying lucrative jobs. According to the BLS survey, the need for all categories direct care workers will grow by 21 percent from 2012 to 2020.